Center for Populations Health Research First Round of Project Collaboration

The Cleveland Clinic Center for Populations Health Research (CPHR), established in 2017, recently announced the first round of projects selected for collaboration. This support is intended to help physicians and investigators leverage Cleveland Clinic’s large and diverse patient population to generate insights about why groups of people or communities are more or less likely to be healthy, and how this can be harnessed and transformed into clinical or community interventions that improve health outcomes at the population level.

Populations health research is critical because, as center director Jesse Schold, PhD, MStat, MEd, explains, the vast majority of health outcomes can be attributed to non-medical factors, or things that are not addressed within the four walls of a hospital.

Instead, the contributing factors are more often related to a person’s race or ethnicity, where they live, their access to care or education level—things that commonly are similar amongst people that live near each other or work together, for example.

The CPHR at Cleveland Clinic studies the widespread health effects of these and other social, behavioral, political and environmental exposures and seeks to understand how interventions like community partnerships, public health policies and others may affect them and improve outcomes. The center now has more than 40 interdisciplinary members from across Cleveland Clinic, with representation from researchers, physicians and administrative personnel.

The CPHR released its inaugural request for proposals earlier this year. The selected projects will benefit at no cost from the wide-ranging expertise of center staff, including statistical programming and analysis, epidemiology, health services research, scientific writing and project management.

The center recently announced the six projects it will collaborate on, including:

  • Computational Analysis of Opioid Poisoning Mortality in Ohio from 2010-2016, led by Tae Hyun Hwang, PhD: This study aims to detect emerging geographic patterns in overdose fatalities and socio-economic factors associated with opioid fatalities.
  • Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and the Metabolic Syndrome in U.S. Adolescents, led by Roy Kim, MD, MPH: This project will determine how likely it is for adolescents who follow a Mediterranean diet pattern to develop metabolic syndrome as compared to adolescents who follow a “Health Eating Index (HEI)-compliant diet.”
  • The Impact of Increased Risk Donors on Survival after Lung Transplantation, led by Carli Lehr, MD, MS, and Maryam Valapour, MD, MPP: This study seeks to identify the impact of using lungs from increased risk donors on short-term (1 year) and long-term (3 years) survival after transplant.
  • Patterns and Outcomes of Interhospital Transfer for Acute Ischemic Stroke, led by Shumei Man, MD, PhD, and Ken Uchino, MD: This project will examine how interhospital transfer patterns and outcomes are associated with patient characteristics, as well as hospitals sending and receiving patients.
  • Patient Travel Distance and Access to Lung Transplant Care: A National Cohort Study, led by Wayne Tsuang, MD, MHS: This study aims to compare how travel distance from patient home to lung transplant center affects pre- and post-transplant survival.
  • Risk Factors for Recurrent Asthma Hospital Visits and Death, led by Joseph Zein, MD, MBA: This study will define risk factors for patients with asthma being readmitted to the hospital using a large cohort of patients followed at Cleveland Clinic for at least one year between 2010 and 2018 and build a model that can predict 30 day re-hospitalization.

The request for proposals will be released quarterly, with the next deadline scheduled for November 20, 2018. Contact Megan Snair, MPH, Program Manager, with questions or for more information.

 





10/17/2018