Digital Imaging Microscopy Core

Services

3-D microscope imaging

"Optical sections" or "Z Stacks" of samples can be obtained on confocal microscopes. The stacks can be reconstructed with software that allows 3-D visualization and analysis.

Confocal microscope

Three point-scanning confocal microscopes are available, each equipped with multiple lasers for fluorescence excitation at a wide variety of wavelengths. This allows users to visualize multi-labeled components of a specimen simultaneously to compare the three-dimensional relationships between them. For example we can visualize fluorescently labeled proteins and compare the quantity and localization relative to other labeled cellular components. A spinning disk confocal is available for time-lapse imaging of live samples. This technology allows long-term observation with minimal photodamage. Seeing cells in three dimensions while they are alive and being able to study their dynamic processes offers a much more realistic understanding of how they work.

Fluorescence microscope

The Core provides training, assistance and access to first-class microscopes for both transmitted light and fluorescence imaging:

  • Four upright microscopes for viewing samples on slides;
  • Two inverted microscopes for viewing living specimens in dishes or flasks.
    (Available Hoffman Modulation Contrast Optics)
    High-resolution CCD cameras on all microscopes allow images to be adjusted through software and saved in digital form.

Image Analysis/Quantitation

To enable post-acquisition processing and image data analysis, the Core provides:

  • Workstations where clients can use leading image rendering and analysis software to do:
    • Color segmentation of fluorescent and histochemical samples;
    • Customized quantitation (area, diameter, integrated intensity, etc.);
    • Automated quantitation (batch processing) of large image stacks;
    • Analysis for colocalization;
    • Filtering and processing images for grants, papers, seminars, etc.
      See Equipment tab for software available.
    • Training in the use of these software applications
    • Processing and/or analysis by Core staff on a case-by-case basis

Infrared scanner (Odyssey)

Use of the near-infrared spectrum significantly reduces autofluorescence. The Li-Cor Odyssey scanner simplifies and ehnahces work with protein gels, Western Blots and In-Cell Western Assays.

Laser capture microdissection

A microscope with a integrated cutting laser allows precise excision and capture of cell groups, single cells, or even parts of cells out of tissue sections or cultures without touching or contaminating them. Such explants can be used for RNA, DNA, or protein analysis.

Light microscope

The Core provides training, assistance and access to first-class microscopes for both transmitted light and fluorescence imaging:Four upright microscopes for viewing samples on slides; Two inverted microscopes for viewing living specimens in dishes or flasks. High-resolution CCD cameras on all microscopes allow images to be adjusted through software and saved in digital form.

Live cell imaging

Inverted microscopes are used to image lives cells in culture (flasks, dishes, or multi-well plates) using transmitted light, phase contrast, DIC, or fluorescence modes. High-resolution CCD cameras allow images to be adjusted through software and saved in digital form.Time-lapse imaging is also possible (see below).

Multi-Photon microscope

Confocal microscopes are limited in their ability to view more than 100 um into a specimen. Investigators often need to see beyond that limit. The core has a multiphoton system that is able to image up to 500um. It can be used for tissue slices or anesthetized animals employing simultaneous multiple IR wavelengths. With it's combination conventional/resonant scanner it can run in either slow scan mode for optimal spatial temporal resolution or fast mode (16,000 lines per second) for imaging rapid dynamic cell events.

Slide scanning

Large specimens on slides can be imaged in their entirety with either transmitted or fluorescence light using a high-resolution slide scanner.

Spinning disk confocal microscope

A spinning disk confocal is available for time-lapse imaging of live samples. This technology allows long-term observation with minimal photodamage. Seeing cells in three dimensions while they are alive and being able to study their dynamic processes offers a much realistic understanding of how they work.

Stereomicroscope

An automated dissecting microscope with color digital camera allows the imaging of large unmounted samples with brightfield and/or fluorescence illumination.

Time-lapse imaging

Time-lapse imaging of living specimens is available with two inverted microscopes that:

  • operate in both transmitted light and fluorescence modes
  • have a motorized stage for capturing multiple time-lapse fields simultaneously
  • provide heat/CO2 incubation
  • accommodate single dishes or multiple-well plates

Individual images from each ROI and time point are then joined to form a movie of the activity in each region over the elapsed time.
High-resolution CCD cameras allow images to be adjusted through software and saved in digital form.TIRF Microscope

A TIRF microscope system is available, for visualizing cell membrane events in living cells.

Two-Photon microscope

Confocal microscopes are limited in their ability to view more than 100 um into a specimen. Investigators often need to see beyond that limit. The core has a multiphoton system that is able to image up to 500um. It can be used for tissue slices or anesthetized animals employing simultaneous multiple IR wavelengths. With it's combination conventional/resonant scanner it can run in either slow scan mode for optimal spatial temporal resolution or fast mode (16,000 lines per second) for imaging rapid dynamic cell events.

Whole slide scanner (microscope)

Large specimens on slides can be imaged in their entirety with either transmitted or fluorescence light using a high-resolution slide scanner.