Jonathan Mark Brown PhD

Assistant Staff

  • Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
  • Lerner Research Institute
  • 9500 Euclid Avenue
  • Cleveland, Ohio 44195
  • brownm5@ccf.org
  • Phone: (216) 444-8340
  • Fax: (216) 444-9404

My research is focused on the interrelationship between lipid metabolism and the development of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. We have three active research programs, and we are always looking for highly motivated young scientists to participate in our multidisciplinary training program. 

Project 1) Mechanism Regulating Trans-Intestinal Cholesterol Excretion (TICE). The process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has long been thought require intact biliary secretion. However, our work has revealed a novel RCT pathway that is independent of biliary secretion. We are currently probing mechanisms driving this novel pathway, and testing novel therapeutics targeting this pathway for protection against atherosclerosis. 

Project 2) Alpha Beta Hydrolase Domain (ABHD) Proteins in Metabolic Disease. We are functionally annotating a family of proteins known as alpha/beta hydrolase domain (ABHD) containing proteins. These proteins are highly conserved lipid metabolizing enzymes, and mutations in several of these proteins have been implicated in inherited inborn errors in lipid metabolism. These studies are uncovering novel roles for ABHD enzymes in the development of obesity, hepatic steatosis, and type II diabetes. 

Project 3) A Lipocentric Strategy for Preventing Flavivirus Infection. This line of research is focused on understanding mechanisms by which several flaviviruses such as the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Dengue Virus (DV), and West Nile Virus (WNV) hijack host lipid metabolism to promote chronic infection. We are studying both cell and mouse models of flavivirus infection, with the long-term goal of strategically targeting host lipid metabolic pathways to prevent chronic flavivirus infection. 

In other words ...

A long-term goal of my laboratory is to understand the fundamental pathways that dictate how our bodies make, store, and degrade fats or lipids. Most chronic diseases that we are faced with today like coronary heart disease, obesity, diabetes, cancer, and even infectious disease are driven by underlying alterations in lipid metabolism. We are making exciting new discoveries that we aim to translate into new therapeutic regimens for metabolic disease.

  • Amanda Brown PhD
  • Research Scholar
  • Location:NN1-27
  • Phone:(216) 444-8339
  • Fax:(216) 444-9404
  • browna16@ccf.org
  • Daniel Ferguson
  • Graduate Student
  • Location:NN1-27
  • Phone:(216) 444-8339
  • Fax:(216) 444-9404
  • fergusd3@ccf.org
  • Stephanie Marshall PhD
  • Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Location:NN1-27
  • Phone:(216) 444-8339
  • Fax:(216) 444-9404
  • marshas@ccf.org
  • Rebecca Schugar PhD
  • Fellow
  • Location:NN1-27
  • Phone:(216) 444-8339
  • Fax:(216) 444-9404
  • schugar@ccf.org
  • Manya Warrier PhD
  • Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Location:NN1-27
  • Phone:(216) 444-8339
  • Fax:(216) 444-9404
  • warriem@ccf.org

1) Temel, et al. (2010) Biliary sterol secretion is not required for macrophage reverse cholesterol transport. Cell Metab. 12(1): 96-102.

2) Lord, C.C., et al. (2012) CGI-58/ABHD5-derived signaling lipids regulate systemic inflammation and insulin action. Diabetes  61(2): 355-363.

3) Cantley, J.L., et al. (2013) CGI-58 knockdown sequesters diacylglycerols in lipid droplets, preventing DAG-mediated PKCε translocation to the plasma membrane and hepatic insulin resistance. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA  110(5): 1869-1874.

4) Koeth, R.A., et al. (2013) Intestinal microbiota metabolism of l-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis. Nat. Med. 19(5): 576-585.

5) Lord, C.C., et al. (2013) Mammalian alpha beta hydrolase domain (ABHD) proteins: glycerophospholipid metabolizing enzymes at the interface of cell signaling and energy metabolism. Biochim. Biophys. Acta  183(4): 792-802.

6) Thomas, G., et al. (2013) The serine hydrolase ABHD6 is a critical regulator of the metabolic syndrome. Cell Rep. 5(2): 508-520.