Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

"Investigating the Cellular Foundations of Human Disease"

Welcome to the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine's website. The Department is home to approximately 18 multidisciplinary teams of scientists who use genetics, molecular, cell, and developmental biology approaches to investigate an array of processes and disease mechanisms. Research areas include cell signaling, angiogenesis, vascular biology, oxidative stress, regulation of gene expression and protein translation, RNA structure and function, lipid and lipoprotein structural biology, metabolic regulation, and cancer stem cell biology and cell migration. Reflecting the strong traditions of Cleveland Clinic, many programs include translational components related to human diseases, including atherosclerosis, cardiac ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, renal diseases and cancer. Although diverse in topic areas, members of the Department's research teams engage in intensive interactions and collaborations, as evidenced by numerous co-authored publications and NIH-sponsored Program Projects.

A fundamental goal of all studies in our department is to define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that cause human diseases, thus establishing a platform for treating and curing those diseases. This goal requires deep understanding of the genetic, molecular, and cellular processes that go awry in the pathological state. It is this understanding that the research teams in our department strive to achieve, a goal fostered by the highly collaborative research environment and by the diverse and complementary skill sets and model systems represented among our scientists.


Please enjoy looking over our website and feel free to contact me, other faculty, or any of our Department's personnel if we can answer your questions and send specific information to you.


Stanley L. Hazen, M.D., PhD.
Chair, Department of Cellular & Molecular Medicine
Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute
Professor, Department of Molecular Medicine,
Case Western Reserve University